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Entries in Motivation (46)

Monday
Jan192015

How To Keep Employees Motivated

Today, we’ll be discussing employee motivation. Whether you’re the CEO of a Fortune 500 company or the owner of a five-person firm, you know that a motivated team is essential to your success. More than that, a demotivated staff can do serious damage to your business.

So, what are the warning signs of demotivated employees? According to a blog on the professional networking site, LinkedIn, there are three key areas to watch out for: workplace atmosphere, job standards, and employee productivity. If any or all of these are trending downwards, there’s a good chance you’re dealing with demotivated employees.

As a business owner or manager, you need to not only motivate employees, but also help them to motivate themselves. Ultimately, your goal is to create an environment that allows your employees to meet or exceed expectations, do their best, and feel valued.

Understanding what motivates employees comes down to knowing your staff as individuals. Remember, we all have different needs, aspirations, and values…therefore, what motivates one employee may not work for another. That’s why your best strategy is to offer a range of motivators to improve performance, enthusiasm, and retention.

Of course, most employees can be motivated by tangible rewards such as salary and promotion. However, there are many intangible motivators such as mentoring, personal and professional growth opportunities, and the ability to work independently that can also get the job done. Indeed, offering your employees the chance to work without excessive supervision will show your faith and trust in them, as will allowing a flexible work schedule that enables them to attend to their personal needs.

It’s also important to recognize employees for jobs well done. This may be via a financial reward such as a bonus, but it can also take the form of a new job title that reflects higher status within the company, or company-wide public recognition and thanks. No matter what you do publicly, it is also a good idea to offer an employee your personal thanks for a job well done.

Also, be sure to keep your employees challenged and engaged. Perhaps it’s time for a lateral move if a promotion isn’t possible; this is a great way to help an employee build his or her skill set. Also consider offering more opportunities for employees to engage with your clients and customers, which can be highly rewarding.

One final thought: as we noted earlier, motivating employees comes down to knowing them as individuals. To do this, you must have open lines of communication and a mutual understanding of both professional and personal goals.

Source: Brittany Capozziello (http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/how-to-keep-employees-motivated-video-blog) December 18, 2014 

Wednesday
Jan072015

Setting Employee Goals 

Today, we’re going to talk about something every supervisor and employee should do: set goals. Whether timed to the start of the calendar year, or done in conjunction with quarterly or annual reviews, goal setting has far-reaching benefits.

Employees who set goals increase both their commitment and motivation, and they become more invested in their jobs and long-term career plans. Employers also benefit—the goal-setting process allows them to direct employees’ efforts toward maximizing accomplishments and…perhaps most importantly…toward supporting the company’s own long-term goals.

Sounds like a win-win…but how do you, as a manager, go about setting goals?

To start, know that goal setting will be most successful when you provide each employee with clear expectations regarding performance that are tied to an understanding of how his or her individual work contributes to the company’s overall goals.

1. Be specific. Clearly communicate the tasks or behaviors employees must accomplish or demonstrate to achieve successful results. Performance goals should function to align employee growth and development with that of your business.

2. Be realistic. You need to set goals that are challenging, but attainable based on your employee’s knowledge, skills and resources. Ask the employee for input, and make sure you monitor and update goals as circumstances change. Your definition of “realistic” may change as the year proceeds.

3. Choose goals that can be measured, and make sure your employees understand exactly how they will be assessed. For example, a salesperson may be measured quantitatively via number of sales, whereas a support employee may be rated qualitatively based on customer satisfaction.

4. Use your calendar—and set deadlines. Setting firm but realistic timeframes for achieving goals will increase productivity. For ongoing or long-term goals, you should regularly monitor progress and offer feedback to keep your employees motivated and focused on your desired outcomes.

5. As you set goals, remember to prioritize. When goals are numerous or complex, it can be easy for employees to lose a sense of priority and simply jump from task to task. As the manager, it’s up to you to rank and prioritize goals so your employees understand the relative importance of each one.

6. Evaluating goals is also important. Since goals are designed to support both the company AND the employee’s personal development, you should evaluate and update goals based on changing business needs and the employee’s progress.

7. Finally, coordinate your employees’ goals so that they complement one another. Break apart more complicated goals into manageable pieces, and delegate them to each employee working as part of a team.

Source: Tom Ceconi (http://blog.hr360.com/hr-blog/setting-employee-goals-video-blog) October 9, 2014 

Wednesday
Dec172014

Peak Performer’s Life: What Do You Desire?

This week on Peak Performer’s Life, Walter Bond talks about successful people and the driving force behind the actions that led to their success.

According to Walter:

“I’ve been around all types of successful people, and I’ve experienced some success myself. One thing I know, if we want to be successful, we have to desire to improve. Some people have this misnomer that successful people just wake up and they’re successful. That’s not true. Success is a process and the only way you can become successful, the only way I can become successful, the only way anyone can become successful is to have the desire to improve.”

How do you maintain your desire to improve? How do you build the desire to improve among the people you lead? Let us know in the comments section below.

New messages each week!
Walter Bond and Peak Performer’s Life is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals. Don’t forget to check back each Wednesday for a new message from Walter Bond! If you missed an episode of Peak Performer’s Life, visit the archive to catch up.

About Walter Bond
A former American professional basketball player, Walter Bond’s NBA career included 153 games with the Dallas Mavericks, Utah Jazz, and Detroit Pistons. Now, Walter takes what he learned from his life on the court and translates it into motivational and educational messages for thriving businesses and careers. For more information, visit WalterBond.com.

Friday
Dec122014

Peak Performer’s Life: Emotional Detox

This week on Peak Performer’s Life, Walter Bond continues his message on making the most of your “off-season” and how important it is to becoming “bigger, stronger, and faster” in both your personal and professional life.

According to Walter:

“I know you want to get bigger. I know you want to get stronger. I know you’re pursuing excellence, but you know what? Let’s take a little time to celebrate. There’s something in your life that you can celebrate.”

How do you take time to celebrate? What effect does it have on your personal and professional life? What effect does it have on the people around you? Let us know in the comments section below.

New messages each week!
Walter Bond and Peak Performer’s Life is brought to you by Express Employment Professionals. Don’t forget to check back each Wednesday for a new message from Walter Bond! If you missed an episode of Peak Performer’s Life, visit the archive to catch up.

About Walter Bond
A former American professional basketball player, Walter Bond’s NBA career included 153 games with the Dallas Mavericks, Utah Jazz, and Detroit Pistons. Now, Walter takes what he learned from his life on the court and translates it into motivational and educational messages for thriving businesses and careers. For more information, visit WalterBond.com.

Friday
Dec122014

Back to Basics: Be a More Effective Leader in 2015

Improvement is crucial in staying competitive in an ever-changing business environment. However, sometimes improving is easier said than done. To become a more effective leader in 2015, it may be time you go back to basics.

Focus on Yourself

Before you can be an effective leader, you must first be able to lead yourself. Take a self-assessment to determine what kind of leader you are—and be honest about your strengths and weaknesses. No one is perfect, and even the greatest leaders in history had weaknesses. You may not be able to change your weaknesses into strengths, but you can see them as learning opportunities. Lessen your weaknesses and build your strengths by focusing on what you’re good at and surrounding yourself with colleagues who complement you. One personal characteristic that can be a morale killer is being too hard on yourself. Your team will notice your negativity and it may spread throughout the office. Focus on being better to yourself and then turn to your team to lead them to do the same.

Read Up on History

Staying well-read is a valuable tool when leading an organization. And although it is wise to read up on leadership books and listen to business podcasts, it can be just as helpful to “read up” on your competition. Pick your five closest competitors and learn their history. What are some of their greatest triumphs? How did they overcome certain obstacles? What are the biggest mistakes they’ve made? By learning from similar organizations, you can borrow methods or avoid their pitfalls. And while the age-old saying, “know your enemy,” is still applicable, the flipside is just as valuable—know yourself. Take the new year as an opportunity to read up on your company’s history, including what/who built it into the organization it is today. Before you know where you’re going, it is important to know where you’ve been.

Expect the Worst

The most difficult aspect of trials and hardships is the unpredictable. When a project fails or an issue arises, it often occurs when you were expecting the opposite. That’s why problems carry such a heavy burden for the parties involved. When you expected a win, a loss can be devastating to a team—and sometimes hard to recover from. Though it is good to have high expectations for your organization, it is also great to operate under Murphy’s Law: anything that can go wrong, will go wrong. No one can predict the future, but you can plan for the worst. When developing your yearly plan or employee development techniques, try and picture every outcome, including personal shortcomings, project holdups, and employee turnover, as well as simple solutions for each problem. Should these issues arise, you and your team will be able to push past them and get back on track.

Empower Your Team

U.S. General George S. Patton once said, “Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do, and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.” One of the most effective leadership techniques is empowering your team with self-worth and self-esteem. Giving your team the tools and freedom to overcome obstacles the way they see fit is one of the surest ways to build a team that will follow you anywhere. Moreover, according to a Gallup survey, only 45% of men and 50% of women are satisfied with the recognition they receive at work for their accomplishments. The 50-55% of workers who aren’t satisfied with recognition may not be engaged in meeting goals in 2015. Scare tactics and fear may work in the short term, but leading by developing your team through motivation and encouragement is the best way to get them to buy into your organization’s vision.

Regardless of your achievements and shortcomings this year, 2015 is a fresh opportunity to take the reins of your team and be a more effective leader. By mastering these four techniques, you will be on your way to a successful business year. What do you do to ensure you are being an effective leader? Let us know in the comments section below!